Crib, cot, what? Navigating the world of baby!

3 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

When I first found out I was going to become a mother I tentatively stepped into the confusing world of parenthood and babies and quickly realised there was a lot I didn’t know and had to learn fast! I was mainly flummoxed by different words used to describe baby products – it seemed every company used a different language and I was getting confused. So here’s the lowdown on what means what in the world of baby!

Crib or cot?

A crib I thought was something that was used when baby Jesus was born! Many nativity plays describe Jesus as lying in his crib. It’s different to a cot in that a crib can have a rocking that helps to soothe baby and importantly it’s larger than a Moses basket but immobile. Many parents wonder how long they can use a crib for? Well, it’s smaller than a cot so baby won’t be in there past the point of them sitting up which can be from 5 months. The US tends to use cribs more – it’s definitely more embedded in their baby language than over here.

For me, I found Moses baskets useful but wait! If you are American you may know that as a bassinet! (See so many words to confuse us!)

After a crib or a Moses basket you could move baby on to a cot and the Schplendid cot bed is a clever move because it lasts until your child is 6! It is available in 4 moKee colours in varnished beech wood and has a real Scandi design to it. Both sides can be removed once your newborn turns into a toddler meaning they will feel like proud big boys and girls in their big bed!

Another option is the Schpinkle cot bed which comes with a super handy drawer underneath. This premium cot bed comes in 2 colours and has clever gate entry available as your child grows.

Dummy or pacifer?!

As the world has got smaller, cultures and language has changed and it’s the same with baby language. I would watch American films when I was young and wonder what a ‘pacifer’ was? Some sort of invention that helps to soothe babies? Was it some sort of rocking machine? No! It is of course a dummy! Well, I felt like a complete dummy as I didn’t realise this until I ended up pregnant!

Pram or pushchair?!

In the UK we use the phrases pram whereas in the US, it’s buggy. When shopping for your first baby vehicle it can be confusing to know what you need and what this is called. Well here you go… a pram is for babies, typically a lot bigger than pushchairs, prams are designed for the first year when you want your baby to feel nice and safe on their travels. A pushchair is a step down from a pram and typically used for older children. I got a pushchair which we used when travelling on holiday and my son who is 4 could probably still use it if he ever got tired (he never gets tired of running around!).

If you have come across any strange baby terms, then please get in touch and let us know in comments or at our Instagram @wearemokee.

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

When I was going to become a mother I tentatively stepped into the confusing world of parenthood and babies. I was flummoxed by different words used to describe baby products.

Blog 1 Crib, cot, what?  Navigating the world of baby!
05 Dec 2019

Crib, cot, what? Navigating the world of baby!

Crib, cot, what? Navigating the world of baby!

3 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

When I first found out I was going to become a mother I tentatively stepped into the confusing world of parenthood and babies and quickly realised there was a lot I didn’t know and had to learn fast! I was mainly flummoxed by different words used to describe baby products – it seemed every company used a different language and I was getting confused. So here’s the lowdown on what means what in the world of baby!

Crib or cot?

A crib I thought was something that was used when baby Jesus was born! Many nativity plays describe Jesus as lying in his crib. It’s different to a cot in that a crib can have a rocking that helps to soothe baby and importantly it’s larger than a Moses basket but immobile. Many parents wonder how long they can use a crib for? Well, it’s smaller than a cot so baby won’t be in there past the point of them sitting up which can be from 5 months. The US tends to use cribs more – it’s definitely more embedded in their baby language than over here.

For me, I found Moses baskets useful but wait! If you are American you may know that as a bassinet! (See so many words to confuse us!)

After a crib or a Moses basket you could move baby on to a cot and the Schplendid cot bed is a clever move because it lasts until your child is 6! It is available in 4 moKee colours in varnished beech wood and has a real Scandi design to it. Both sides can be removed once your newborn turns into a toddler meaning they will feel like proud big boys and girls in their big bed!

Another option is the Schpinkle cot bed which comes with a super handy drawer underneath. This premium cot bed comes in 2 colours and has clever gate entry available as your child grows.

Dummy or pacifer?!

As the world has got smaller, cultures and language has changed and it’s the same with baby language. I would watch American films when I was young and wonder what a ‘pacifer’ was? Some sort of invention that helps to soothe babies? Was it some sort of rocking machine? No! It is of course a dummy! Well, I felt like a complete dummy as I didn’t realise this until I ended up pregnant!

Pram or pushchair?!

In the UK we use the phrases pram whereas in the US, it’s buggy. When shopping for your first baby vehicle it can be confusing to know what you need and what this is called. Well here you go… a pram is for babies, typically a lot bigger than pushchairs, prams are designed for the first year when you want your baby to feel nice and safe on their travels. A pushchair is a step down from a pram and typically used for older children. I got a pushchair which we used when travelling on holiday and my son who is 4 could probably still use it if he ever got tired (he never gets tired of running around!).

If you have come across any strange baby terms, then please get in touch and let us know in comments or at our Instagram @wearemokee.

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

When I was going to become a mother I tentatively stepped into the confusing world of parenthood and babies. I was flummoxed by different words used to describe baby products.

0

Nursery colours - which one should you choose?

3 minutes read

by Suzi Smith @suziabi

Choosing the right colour for your baby’s nursery is something that many parents have trouble deciding on. Blue for boys and pink for girls was for a long time the go-to colour choice, but now anything goes, even black! Here, moKee reveals how a baby’s nursery colour could even influence their personality….

Red works perfect but only as an accent in the nursery. Look to use this passionate colour to add a splash of colour, perhaps as a statement wall or in the accessories you choose to dress the room. As a hot colour red can evoke emotion in people, so it could influence your baby to be more emotional, passionate and to stand out from the crowd.

Orange will help create a warm, cozy feel in your nursery. It promotes a feeling of wellness and can help develop friendly, calm babies. Orange is best used in accessories so soft furnishings work well in this colour.

Want a lively and cheerful baby? Then pick yellow. Sunshine yellow should be used with caution- perhaps use sparkingly in a mural whereas soft yellow can be used to help promote concentration, so statement walls and even yellow nursery furniture can work well.

Picture by @danusiowa

Nurseries are learning environments so green is the best colour to use to help promote and encourage learning. It’s a nurturing, soft, calming colour so baby can feel relaxed yet still engaged with their surroundings. Green is also abundant in nature so stick to Mother Nature green and you’ll be on the right track!

For calm babies pick blue. Blue promotes healing and calmness, however be careful with which shade you choose as a grey blue can promote sadness. Stick to warm and bright blues, avoiding darker shades and you’ll inspire your baby to be calm under pressure.

Purple can inspire serenity and a taste for luxury in baby. A strong purple has long been associated with royalty however pastel purples, like lavenders help create a serene baby.

White is an obvious choice for a nursery as babies are angelic and innocent. White will help evoke neutrality in a baby, being able to see both sides of the argument in future life as they keep a cool head. Ensure that you have colour accents throughout the room and remember that baby stains do show up more on white than other colours.

Pink offers up loving feelings in baby as well as calmness, so it’s the perfect colour for babies who like to throw a tantrum! Pastel pinks can be used throughout the nursery however stick to vibrant pinks for accents in the room. If you want your baby to be a loving adult, pick pink.

Grey nurseries are popular as it’s a great neutral colour to match with stronger colours. Grey evokes intuition and introspection so you might choose grey for budding writers and poets.

Black nurseries were once a big no, no, however black can be used in larger nurseries with a lot of natural light. Use sparingly, perhaps a black cot and black furniture mixed with lighter tones. Black immediately inspires power, so if you want to develop a little leader, go with black.

 

And what do you think? Share your opinion in comments - let us know which colour you chose for your baby's nursery and why!

by Suzi Smith @suziabi

Choosing the right colour for your baby’s nursery is something that many parents have trouble deciding on. Here, moKee reveals how a baby’s nursery colour could even influence their personality...

Blog 1 Nursery colours - do they influence a baby’s personality?
04 Dec 2019

Nursery colours - do they influence a baby’s personality?

Nursery colours - which one should you choose?

3 minutes read

by Suzi Smith @suziabi

Choosing the right colour for your baby’s nursery is something that many parents have trouble deciding on. Blue for boys and pink for girls was for a long time the go-to colour choice, but now anything goes, even black! Here, moKee reveals how a baby’s nursery colour could even influence their personality….

Red works perfect but only as an accent in the nursery. Look to use this passionate colour to add a splash of colour, perhaps as a statement wall or in the accessories you choose to dress the room. As a hot colour red can evoke emotion in people, so it could influence your baby to be more emotional, passionate and to stand out from the crowd.

Orange will help create a warm, cozy feel in your nursery. It promotes a feeling of wellness and can help develop friendly, calm babies. Orange is best used in accessories so soft furnishings work well in this colour.

Want a lively and cheerful baby? Then pick yellow. Sunshine yellow should be used with caution- perhaps use sparkingly in a mural whereas soft yellow can be used to help promote concentration, so statement walls and even yellow nursery furniture can work well.

Picture by @danusiowa

Nurseries are learning environments so green is the best colour to use to help promote and encourage learning. It’s a nurturing, soft, calming colour so baby can feel relaxed yet still engaged with their surroundings. Green is also abundant in nature so stick to Mother Nature green and you’ll be on the right track!

For calm babies pick blue. Blue promotes healing and calmness, however be careful with which shade you choose as a grey blue can promote sadness. Stick to warm and bright blues, avoiding darker shades and you’ll inspire your baby to be calm under pressure.

Purple can inspire serenity and a taste for luxury in baby. A strong purple has long been associated with royalty however pastel purples, like lavenders help create a serene baby.

White is an obvious choice for a nursery as babies are angelic and innocent. White will help evoke neutrality in a baby, being able to see both sides of the argument in future life as they keep a cool head. Ensure that you have colour accents throughout the room and remember that baby stains do show up more on white than other colours.

Pink offers up loving feelings in baby as well as calmness, so it’s the perfect colour for babies who like to throw a tantrum! Pastel pinks can be used throughout the nursery however stick to vibrant pinks for accents in the room. If you want your baby to be a loving adult, pick pink.

Grey nurseries are popular as it’s a great neutral colour to match with stronger colours. Grey evokes intuition and introspection so you might choose grey for budding writers and poets.

Black nurseries were once a big no, no, however black can be used in larger nurseries with a lot of natural light. Use sparingly, perhaps a black cot and black furniture mixed with lighter tones. Black immediately inspires power, so if you want to develop a little leader, go with black.

 

And what do you think? Share your opinion in comments - let us know which colour you chose for your baby's nursery and why!

by Suzi Smith @suziabi

Choosing the right colour for your baby’s nursery is something that many parents have trouble deciding on. Here, moKee reveals how a baby’s nursery colour could even influence their personality...

0

Is black the perfect colour for the nursery or what?

2 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

If you are expecting a baby, then moKee are here to help you prepare with some products that are designed in baby’s favourite colour – black!

There are so many surprises about a baby’s development and when I had my son I was shocked to learn that baby’s love the colour black! Why had I bothered buying everything in bright colours then?!

According to research, a baby's colour perception is limited at birth with them only being able to focus on objects 8 to 10 inches away. Between 1 and 3 months old their eyesight continually develops in quality and range, although it’s still quite limited. Babies should begin to follow moving objects with their eyes and reach for things at around three months of age.

As young eyes are developing and learning to focus on the world around them, black and white books with simple lines and bold patterns are easier for babies to see. These bold images stand out against a typically blurry world.

It is not until around the fifth month that the eyes are capable of working together to form a three-dimensional view of the world and begin to see in depth.

So what’s better than the collection of moKee products made in black and white? moKee are bringing out the Mini Cot in Deep Black [from 27/11/2019], the changing mat in Black & White and the Mini Gym with black & white toys. Remember that newborns and babies prefer patterns with high contrast and clear borders between light and dark fields until the end of the 2 month of life. It's best if the designs have a moderate level of complexity.

 

Monochrome is gender neutral- so perfect if you don’t know the gender of the baby. You can always add hints of pink or blue once the baby arrives. Parents are definitely embracing monochrome style as it is no only trendy but also practical and at the same time, it has a great impact on your baby’s development.

 

Are you looking for an inspiration? Take a look at nursery designs created by moKee parents - visit our Instagram! 

Mini Cot in Deep Black will be available at moKee from 27th of November 2019.  

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

If you are expecting a baby, then moKee are here to help you prepare with some products that are designed in baby’s favourite colour – black! Monochrome is gender neutral- so perfect if you don’t know the gender of the baby.

Blog 1 Is black the perfect colour for the nursery or what?
26 Nov 2019

Is black the perfect colour for the nursery or what?

Is black the perfect colour for the nursery or what?

2 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

If you are expecting a baby, then moKee are here to help you prepare with some products that are designed in baby’s favourite colour – black!

There are so many surprises about a baby’s development and when I had my son I was shocked to learn that baby’s love the colour black! Why had I bothered buying everything in bright colours then?!

According to research, a baby's colour perception is limited at birth with them only being able to focus on objects 8 to 10 inches away. Between 1 and 3 months old their eyesight continually develops in quality and range, although it’s still quite limited. Babies should begin to follow moving objects with their eyes and reach for things at around three months of age.

As young eyes are developing and learning to focus on the world around them, black and white books with simple lines and bold patterns are easier for babies to see. These bold images stand out against a typically blurry world.

It is not until around the fifth month that the eyes are capable of working together to form a three-dimensional view of the world and begin to see in depth.

So what’s better than the collection of moKee products made in black and white? moKee are bringing out the Mini Cot in Deep Black [from 27/11/2019], the changing mat in Black & White and the Mini Gym with black & white toys. Remember that newborns and babies prefer patterns with high contrast and clear borders between light and dark fields until the end of the 2 month of life. It's best if the designs have a moderate level of complexity.

 

Monochrome is gender neutral- so perfect if you don’t know the gender of the baby. You can always add hints of pink or blue once the baby arrives. Parents are definitely embracing monochrome style as it is no only trendy but also practical and at the same time, it has a great impact on your baby’s development.

 

Are you looking for an inspiration? Take a look at nursery designs created by moKee parents - visit our Instagram! 

Mini Cot in Deep Black will be available at moKee from 27th of November 2019.  

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

If you are expecting a baby, then moKee are here to help you prepare with some products that are designed in baby’s favourite colour – black! Monochrome is gender neutral- so perfect if you don’t know the gender of the baby.

0

A guide to Moses baskets

3 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Your journey as a parent starts with decisions - lots of decisions. From what pram to buy to whether you should train your baby to sleep. Parents make a lot of decisions and one of the first is where their precious newborn should sleep.

A Moses basket or cot?

There are two options for a newborn – a Moses basket or a cot. Moses baskets date back centuries and its name comes from the biblical story of Moses being left in a cradle of bulrushes. His basket was made of wicker or straw and commonly Moses baskets are made from a sturdy, natural material.

moKee has a range of Moses baskets to choose from. I chose the WoolNest for both of my sons and really loved the felt material and with its high sides my babies felt cocooned and snug. It can come with a stand which was super useful, keeping baby high and away from our sweet but curious cat.

Their Classic Wicker Moses Basket has a clever rocking stand which in retrospect would have come in handy! It also has a retractable hood which helps shelter from noises and distractions.

If you’re looking for something a bit different take a look at the Soft Seagrass Moses Basket. This basket comes in a natural colour, turquoise or burnt orange and the soft leather handles make the basket sturdy and safe for baby.

How long can you use a Moses basket?

Moses baskets and cribs are only appropriate for newborns and should only be used until your baby is around three to four months old. When they get to 4 months you’ll find that they are starting to get heavy and more alert, meaning you probably won’t be carrying around a sleeping baby- they’ll need somewhere stationary for naps.

Moses basket safety

When placing your baby in the Moses basket make sure they are in the "feet to foot" position, with their feet at the end of the cot or Moses basket.

The mattress in the Moses basket is very important too. The Lullaby Trust, a charity preventing unexpected deaths in infancy and promoting infant health, advise that it is important that the mattress is firm, entirely flat, and waterproof, with no soft or cushioned areas, particularly around baby’s head. Soft mattresses are known to increase the risk of SIDS. They make it harder for babies to lose body heat, which can cause them to become too hot. The surface of the mattress should be firm enough that when your baby is placed on it, their head does not sink in more than a few millimetres.

Why not take a look at our useful TOG Guide to help you work out what to dress your baby in for naps and night time.

What else do I need with a Moses basket?

So you’ve decided on a Moses basket but what else do you need? How many sheets will I need? What bedding do I need?

Firstly you must make sure you have a firm, clean mattress. And I would get a number of fitted sheets. Sicky babies means you’ll be needing them. It’s also useful to have liners - this makes it easy to keep the basket clean and moKee has some lovely, striking designs.

Stands aren’t essential but I found that by elevating baby high it meant I wasn’t leaning down as much which can be difficult after giving birth! It also means you can keep them away from any curious pets!

I swaddled both of my babies – that’s another decision every parent must make.  Take a look at our guide to swaddling here.

So, if you’re thinking of using a Moses basket check out our guide on how to help your baby sleep. Happy sleeping!

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Your journey as a parent starts with decisions- lots of decisions. From what pram to buy to whether you should train your baby to sleep. Parents make a lot of decisions and one of the first is where their precious newborn should sleep.

Blog 1 A full guide to Moses baskets - helping babies & parents!
14 Nov 2019

A full guide to Moses baskets - helping babies & parents!

A guide to Moses baskets

3 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Your journey as a parent starts with decisions - lots of decisions. From what pram to buy to whether you should train your baby to sleep. Parents make a lot of decisions and one of the first is where their precious newborn should sleep.

A Moses basket or cot?

There are two options for a newborn – a Moses basket or a cot. Moses baskets date back centuries and its name comes from the biblical story of Moses being left in a cradle of bulrushes. His basket was made of wicker or straw and commonly Moses baskets are made from a sturdy, natural material.

moKee has a range of Moses baskets to choose from. I chose the WoolNest for both of my sons and really loved the felt material and with its high sides my babies felt cocooned and snug. It can come with a stand which was super useful, keeping baby high and away from our sweet but curious cat.

Their Classic Wicker Moses Basket has a clever rocking stand which in retrospect would have come in handy! It also has a retractable hood which helps shelter from noises and distractions.

If you’re looking for something a bit different take a look at the Soft Seagrass Moses Basket. This basket comes in a natural colour, turquoise or burnt orange and the soft leather handles make the basket sturdy and safe for baby.

How long can you use a Moses basket?

Moses baskets and cribs are only appropriate for newborns and should only be used until your baby is around three to four months old. When they get to 4 months you’ll find that they are starting to get heavy and more alert, meaning you probably won’t be carrying around a sleeping baby- they’ll need somewhere stationary for naps.

Moses basket safety

When placing your baby in the Moses basket make sure they are in the "feet to foot" position, with their feet at the end of the cot or Moses basket.

The mattress in the Moses basket is very important too. The Lullaby Trust, a charity preventing unexpected deaths in infancy and promoting infant health, advise that it is important that the mattress is firm, entirely flat, and waterproof, with no soft or cushioned areas, particularly around baby’s head. Soft mattresses are known to increase the risk of SIDS. They make it harder for babies to lose body heat, which can cause them to become too hot. The surface of the mattress should be firm enough that when your baby is placed on it, their head does not sink in more than a few millimetres.

Why not take a look at our useful TOG Guide to help you work out what to dress your baby in for naps and night time.

What else do I need with a Moses basket?

So you’ve decided on a Moses basket but what else do you need? How many sheets will I need? What bedding do I need?

Firstly you must make sure you have a firm, clean mattress. And I would get a number of fitted sheets. Sicky babies means you’ll be needing them. It’s also useful to have liners - this makes it easy to keep the basket clean and moKee has some lovely, striking designs.

Stands aren’t essential but I found that by elevating baby high it meant I wasn’t leaning down as much which can be difficult after giving birth! It also means you can keep them away from any curious pets!

I swaddled both of my babies – that’s another decision every parent must make.  Take a look at our guide to swaddling here.

So, if you’re thinking of using a Moses basket check out our guide on how to help your baby sleep. Happy sleeping!

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Your journey as a parent starts with decisions- lots of decisions. From what pram to buy to whether you should train your baby to sleep. Parents make a lot of decisions and one of the first is where their precious newborn should sleep.

0

How to swaddle your baby - full guide

5 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Being a parent means you become good at a lot of things. Toddler negotiation, surviving on little sleep, being able to text whilst simultaneously feeding and clearing up sick and also that technique called ‘swaddling’.

Ask any new parent and they’ve definitely got a view on how to swaddle a baby correctly.

So what is swaddling?

To swaddle means ‘to wrap a baby tightly in cloth’ to restrict movement. It’s an ancient practice that has been around for centuries and continues to be popular today – though there are certain techniques to ensure baby is not harmed and simply feels snug and secure. By restricting movement it’s thought that it helps a baby to sleep longer (though there’s no research to back this up). Stopping a baby from waking themselves up from their startle reflex means they generally sleep longer.

It’s important to be aware of the risks involved in swaddling. Research has shown swaddled babies feed less frequently, suckle less effectively and that their inhibited arm movement affects their arousal pathways.1

 

Medical opinion on whether swaddling is good practice is divided so be sure to understand all of the risks and swaddle correctly. Never swaddle a baby who is feeding- particularly breastfeeding babies. When breastfeeding they get hot and it is also difficult for babies to get into the natural position for feeding so best leave swaddling to naps.

When swaddling make sure baby is in a natural position (the frog position). Some research shows that babies who are swaddled are at greater risk of hip dysplasia (a developmental problem with a baby’s hip joint). You can reduce this by not swaddling too tightly and making sure you are using correct techniques where baby’s hips and knees are free.

It’s also important to note that swaddled babies must never be put on their front to sleep. In this position there is a greater risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and when swaddled on their front they are limited in movement. It’s important for baby’s to be able to lift their head and turn when sleeping on their front and when swaddled this is restricted. Therefore, only newborns should be swaddled and once a baby can roll you should stop swaddling in case they roll onto their front.

How to swaddle with a muslin blanket

With both of my sons I preferred to swaddle with a large muslin blanket. They’re light and breathable which is important to stop baby from overheating. Today there are some beautifully soft muslin swaddles – check out moKee’s organic bamboo muslins.

Here are safe steps to swaddle a baby:

How to wrap a newborn baby in a blanket

If you find swaddling tricky then there are modern, specially-designed swaddling blankets that are made to be hip-friendly and have fastenings to make swaddling easier. Remember that every baby is different and some will sleep best when swaddled and indeed some newborns may hate it. Happy swaddling!


by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Being a parent means you become good at a lot of things. Toddler negotiation, surviving on little sleep, being able to text whilst simultaneously feeding and clearing up sick and also that technique called ‘swaddling’.

Blog 1 How to swaddle your baby? A guide to baby swaddling by moKee
13 Nov 2019

How to swaddle your baby? A guide to baby swaddling by moKee

How to swaddle your baby - full guide

5 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Being a parent means you become good at a lot of things. Toddler negotiation, surviving on little sleep, being able to text whilst simultaneously feeding and clearing up sick and also that technique called ‘swaddling’.

Ask any new parent and they’ve definitely got a view on how to swaddle a baby correctly.

So what is swaddling?

To swaddle means ‘to wrap a baby tightly in cloth’ to restrict movement. It’s an ancient practice that has been around for centuries and continues to be popular today – though there are certain techniques to ensure baby is not harmed and simply feels snug and secure. By restricting movement it’s thought that it helps a baby to sleep longer (though there’s no research to back this up). Stopping a baby from waking themselves up from their startle reflex means they generally sleep longer.

It’s important to be aware of the risks involved in swaddling. Research has shown swaddled babies feed less frequently, suckle less effectively and that their inhibited arm movement affects their arousal pathways.1

 

Medical opinion on whether swaddling is good practice is divided so be sure to understand all of the risks and swaddle correctly. Never swaddle a baby who is feeding- particularly breastfeeding babies. When breastfeeding they get hot and it is also difficult for babies to get into the natural position for feeding so best leave swaddling to naps.

When swaddling make sure baby is in a natural position (the frog position). Some research shows that babies who are swaddled are at greater risk of hip dysplasia (a developmental problem with a baby’s hip joint). You can reduce this by not swaddling too tightly and making sure you are using correct techniques where baby’s hips and knees are free.

It’s also important to note that swaddled babies must never be put on their front to sleep. In this position there is a greater risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and when swaddled on their front they are limited in movement. It’s important for baby’s to be able to lift their head and turn when sleeping on their front and when swaddled this is restricted. Therefore, only newborns should be swaddled and once a baby can roll you should stop swaddling in case they roll onto their front.

How to swaddle with a muslin blanket

With both of my sons I preferred to swaddle with a large muslin blanket. They’re light and breathable which is important to stop baby from overheating. Today there are some beautifully soft muslin swaddles – check out moKee’s organic bamboo muslins.

Here are safe steps to swaddle a baby:

How to wrap a newborn baby in a blanket

If you find swaddling tricky then there are modern, specially-designed swaddling blankets that are made to be hip-friendly and have fastenings to make swaddling easier. Remember that every baby is different and some will sleep best when swaddled and indeed some newborns may hate it. Happy swaddling!


by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Being a parent means you become good at a lot of things. Toddler negotiation, surviving on little sleep, being able to text whilst simultaneously feeding and clearing up sick and also that technique called ‘swaddling’.

0

How to encourage your baby to eat more vegetables & fruits?

3 mins read

by Nichola Ludlam-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

Most of us are aware of how important it is for our offspring to eat fruit and vegetables; after all, they provide vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that help babies and children to grow and thrive. In particular, nutrients such as vitamin C help to keep their immune systems in good working order which is essential when they start to play with other children. A mixture of different coloured fruits and vegetables is recommended in order to obtain a wide variety of different nutrients.

Below you’ll find my top 10 food-based tips for getting your children (babies to primary school age) to include more fruit and vegetables in their diet, and I really hope you find it useful!

Please, note that in general the introduction of foods (weaning) isn’t recommended until babies are at least 6 months old. Honey should not be introduced for the first year of life.

1) When you’re weaning your baby start with vegetables, preferably a mix of pureed and soft sticks to hold, as opposed to fruit.

It’s good to introduce bitter tastes early on, as opposed to sweet tastes which babies already have a preference for (milk is a sweet food!). Offering a combination of pureed (spoon fed) and finger food (baby led) can be helpful to ensure a good nutrient intake alongside developing the skills required to eat and chew.

2) If your baby isn’t keen on bitter vegetables such as kale straight away, try chopping it up, steaming it, and then mixing it with root vegetables such as parsnips or sweet potato, gradually increasing the number of greens that you add each time. Keep offering the bitter vegetable on its own as well though until they accept it willingly!

This will help babies to gradually get used to more bitter tastes in a more familiar/sweeter environment!

3) Try blending or mashing similar colours of vegetables together; chopped spinach and avocado work well for a creamy green mush!

This works well for combining fruit and vegetables as it ensures that you don’t end up with a brown unappetizing mush at the end!

4) Combine different flavours as you would in soups, for example, leeks can be finely chopped, steamed and mashed into butternut squash. Just don’t add any salt.

Colourful vegetables such as butternut squash are appealing to eat but can be made more nutrient dense by adding in other vegetables. Orange vegetables are usually rich in vitamin A and green vegetables are typically rich in vitamin K.

5) Blend a variety of berries, pears or peaches with natural full-fat yoghurt and freeze into ice-lollies.

These delicious healthy frozen treats contain no added sugar and provide nutrients such as calcium and vitamin C too.

6) From the age of around 10 months, make sure that every meal contains at least 1 type of fruit or vegetable; you could mash bananas into baby rice or porridge for breakfast, serve vegetable and pitta breadsticks with hummus for lunch, and mix cauliflower into the potato with cheese for dinner.

If their meals don’t contain fruits or vegetables then it will be more difficult for them to reach their 5 a day.

7) If you have a fussy eater you could disguise vegetables by blending them into a homemade tomato sauce. Make a big batch and use it for pasta dishes or meals made with mince, but remember to include a portion of the blended vegetables on the side too, to help with familiarity, even if they don’t eat it!

The sauce that they eat will be bursting with more vitamins, minerals and fibre, plus they will be getting exposure to the vegetables (currently) disliked at the same time.

8) Make vegetables FUN; this could mean making fun faces with them on pizzas or cutting them up and taking pictures with them on the plate; for example a house or a flower. You can also use fruits and vegetables during playtime too; for example, making edible paint and potato-stamps!

Food should be talked about and enjoyed at any time of the day, and if meals are fun to look at then children will be likely to eat more.

9) Get kids involved with the food preparation; from choosing it at the supermarket to showing them how to wash and cut it (must be supervised at all times). You could even grow vegetables in the garden or in an allotment. Fruit kebabs make a healthy dessert and children can pick which fruits they add in what order!

Make eating healthily a hobby as if you talk about food and the goodness it provides from a young age then they will be more likely to take an interest in it when they are older.

10) Eat as a family and be a positive role model. Give children the same vegetables that you are eating and show them how enjoyable they can be to eat. Make sure to serve a variety of vegetables over the week from early on and keep persevering; it can take a fair few times for all vegetables to be accepted!

Not only does eating as a family teach good table manners but children tend to copy and mimic their elders; meaning they are more likely to eat their vegetables if you do too. Children are also more likely to take an interest in food the more times that they are exposed to it.

 

How do you get your baby or child to eat more fruit and vegetables? Share your experiences in comments!

by Nichola Ludlam-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

Simple and creative ways to encourage your baby to eat more vegetables & fruits. They are a big part of each child's nutrition as they provide vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that help babies and children to grow and thrive.

Blog 1 Tips to make your baby loving vegetables & fruits
04 Nov 2019

Tips to make your baby loving vegetables & fruits

How to encourage your baby to eat more vegetables & fruits?

3 mins read

by Nichola Ludlam-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

Most of us are aware of how important it is for our offspring to eat fruit and vegetables; after all, they provide vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that help babies and children to grow and thrive. In particular, nutrients such as vitamin C help to keep their immune systems in good working order which is essential when they start to play with other children. A mixture of different coloured fruits and vegetables is recommended in order to obtain a wide variety of different nutrients.

Below you’ll find my top 10 food-based tips for getting your children (babies to primary school age) to include more fruit and vegetables in their diet, and I really hope you find it useful!

Please, note that in general the introduction of foods (weaning) isn’t recommended until babies are at least 6 months old. Honey should not be introduced for the first year of life.

1) When you’re weaning your baby start with vegetables, preferably a mix of pureed and soft sticks to hold, as opposed to fruit.

It’s good to introduce bitter tastes early on, as opposed to sweet tastes which babies already have a preference for (milk is a sweet food!). Offering a combination of pureed (spoon fed) and finger food (baby led) can be helpful to ensure a good nutrient intake alongside developing the skills required to eat and chew.

2) If your baby isn’t keen on bitter vegetables such as kale straight away, try chopping it up, steaming it, and then mixing it with root vegetables such as parsnips or sweet potato, gradually increasing the number of greens that you add each time. Keep offering the bitter vegetable on its own as well though until they accept it willingly!

This will help babies to gradually get used to more bitter tastes in a more familiar/sweeter environment!

3) Try blending or mashing similar colours of vegetables together; chopped spinach and avocado work well for a creamy green mush!

This works well for combining fruit and vegetables as it ensures that you don’t end up with a brown unappetizing mush at the end!

4) Combine different flavours as you would in soups, for example, leeks can be finely chopped, steamed and mashed into butternut squash. Just don’t add any salt.

Colourful vegetables such as butternut squash are appealing to eat but can be made more nutrient dense by adding in other vegetables. Orange vegetables are usually rich in vitamin A and green vegetables are typically rich in vitamin K.

5) Blend a variety of berries, pears or peaches with natural full-fat yoghurt and freeze into ice-lollies.

These delicious healthy frozen treats contain no added sugar and provide nutrients such as calcium and vitamin C too.

6) From the age of around 10 months, make sure that every meal contains at least 1 type of fruit or vegetable; you could mash bananas into baby rice or porridge for breakfast, serve vegetable and pitta breadsticks with hummus for lunch, and mix cauliflower into the potato with cheese for dinner.

If their meals don’t contain fruits or vegetables then it will be more difficult for them to reach their 5 a day.

7) If you have a fussy eater you could disguise vegetables by blending them into a homemade tomato sauce. Make a big batch and use it for pasta dishes or meals made with mince, but remember to include a portion of the blended vegetables on the side too, to help with familiarity, even if they don’t eat it!

The sauce that they eat will be bursting with more vitamins, minerals and fibre, plus they will be getting exposure to the vegetables (currently) disliked at the same time.

8) Make vegetables FUN; this could mean making fun faces with them on pizzas or cutting them up and taking pictures with them on the plate; for example a house or a flower. You can also use fruits and vegetables during playtime too; for example, making edible paint and potato-stamps!

Food should be talked about and enjoyed at any time of the day, and if meals are fun to look at then children will be likely to eat more.

9) Get kids involved with the food preparation; from choosing it at the supermarket to showing them how to wash and cut it (must be supervised at all times). You could even grow vegetables in the garden or in an allotment. Fruit kebabs make a healthy dessert and children can pick which fruits they add in what order!

Make eating healthily a hobby as if you talk about food and the goodness it provides from a young age then they will be more likely to take an interest in it when they are older.

10) Eat as a family and be a positive role model. Give children the same vegetables that you are eating and show them how enjoyable they can be to eat. Make sure to serve a variety of vegetables over the week from early on and keep persevering; it can take a fair few times for all vegetables to be accepted!

Not only does eating as a family teach good table manners but children tend to copy and mimic their elders; meaning they are more likely to eat their vegetables if you do too. Children are also more likely to take an interest in food the more times that they are exposed to it.

 

How do you get your baby or child to eat more fruit and vegetables? Share your experiences in comments!

by Nichola Ludlam-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

Simple and creative ways to encourage your baby to eat more vegetables & fruits. They are a big part of each child's nutrition as they provide vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that help babies and children to grow and thrive.

0

Help! My baby won’t sleep in the Moses basket

4 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

As a mum of two and just getting out of the sleep-deprived phase, I can rejoice that my baby now (mostly) sleeps through the night! But there are moments in a baby's first few months which send you into the depths of Google. I remember googling 'how to get my baby to sleep?', 'how long should my baby sleep?' and 'why can't my baby sleep through the night?'!

A question I also asked often was, 'why on earth did my baby not want to sleep in his Moses basket?!' When my first son was born we discovered moKee and loved all of their designs and style, and we promptly bought the Mini Cot and their Moses basket, the WoolNest. It seemed sensible to have a Moses basket for him to sleep snugly in his first few weeks. BUT. He did not sleep in his Moses basket.

WHY?!

The WoolNest is so soft and has deep sides, so he felt cocooned. The cat thought it was the perfect place for a nap, but my son thought differently. He slept everywhere else - the buggy, the sling, on me, the bouncy chair. But why not the Moses basket?!

Being sleep deprived can take its toll, and it's hard to think clearly amongst the baby fog. So, here are my top 3 tips if you are having a hard time getting your baby to sleep in their Moses basket!

How to get baby to sleep in Moses basket

 

1) Make sure your baby knows the difference between night and day. Doing this can be hard – a sleepy baby in the day and a wide-awake baby at night can have its benefits. You can get so much done in the day! All of that washing and cooking can be finished as baby is asleep, hurrah! But then comes night and you want to kick yourself for allowing baby to sleep all day. So- when you put baby down for a nap remember to put them in a dark room but when awake make sure they have lots of natural light. At night, make sure you have a quiet, serene environment. Make baby aware that it is dark and dark means sleep!

2) Before a nap, make sure they are happy and content. Before putting baby down in a Moses basket, prepare them for nap time. Make sure they have a clean nappy and aren't hungry. Make sure they aren't overtired- this can be difficult to predict but getting them down for a nap before they're almost pulling their ear off will, of course, make it easier for them to nod off. Keep the room dark and have a cuddle before gently putting them down. Talking to them and telling them 'it's nap time now' and doing this consistently will help them realise that the Moses basket is for sleeping.

3) Put baby down in the Moses basket awake. After having a cuddle and soothing them make sure baby is put down awake. Being able to put themselves to sleep is a huge step in establishing a healthy sleeping pattern. As they grow, babies will be able to self soothe themselves without waking you up in the middle of the night.

How long should baby stay in Moses basket?

So, you've got your baby to sleep in the Moses basket. Hurrah! But there are concerns as to how long a baby should stay in a Moses basket. They are only appropriate for newborns and should only be used until your baby is around three to four months old. When placing your baby in the Moses basket make sure they are in the "feet to foot" position, with their feet at the end of the cot or Moses basket.

The mattress in the Moses basket is significant too. The Lullaby Trust, a charity preventing unexpected deaths in infancy and promoting infant health, advise that "it is important that the mattress is firm, entirely flat, and waterproof, with no soft or cushioned areas, particularly around baby's head. Soft mattresses are known to increase the risk of SIDS. They make it harder for babies to lose body heat, which can cause them to become too hot. The surface of the mattress should be firm enough that when your baby is placed on it, their head does not sink in more than a few millimetres.

Safety is, of course, the main priority when it comes to choosing a Moses basket for your baby so make sure its handles are durable and won't break. They should meet in the middle, and you should always carry the basket with one hand underneath to support the baby.

Moses baskets can be incredibly practical, allowing you to be with baby while they are asleep- being able to move them from room to room when getting on with the endless tasks that come with parenthood.  

Encouraging your baby to nap in a snug and safe Moses basket will hopefully make for a happy baby.

 

Happy sleeping!

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

References:

1. The Lullaby Trust Product Guide

2. Reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Are you having a hard time when getting your baby to sleep in their Moses basket? Follow our tips to resolve this problem and to provide your baby the high - quality sleep. Tested and recommended by moKee parents.

Blog 1 Help! My Baby Won't Sleep In Their Moses Basket
04 Nov 2019

Help! My Baby Won't Sleep In Their Moses Basket

Help! My baby won’t sleep in the Moses basket

4 mins read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

As a mum of two and just getting out of the sleep-deprived phase, I can rejoice that my baby now (mostly) sleeps through the night! But there are moments in a baby's first few months which send you into the depths of Google. I remember googling 'how to get my baby to sleep?', 'how long should my baby sleep?' and 'why can't my baby sleep through the night?'!

A question I also asked often was, 'why on earth did my baby not want to sleep in his Moses basket?!' When my first son was born we discovered moKee and loved all of their designs and style, and we promptly bought the Mini Cot and their Moses basket, the WoolNest. It seemed sensible to have a Moses basket for him to sleep snugly in his first few weeks. BUT. He did not sleep in his Moses basket.

WHY?!

The WoolNest is so soft and has deep sides, so he felt cocooned. The cat thought it was the perfect place for a nap, but my son thought differently. He slept everywhere else - the buggy, the sling, on me, the bouncy chair. But why not the Moses basket?!

Being sleep deprived can take its toll, and it's hard to think clearly amongst the baby fog. So, here are my top 3 tips if you are having a hard time getting your baby to sleep in their Moses basket!

How to get baby to sleep in Moses basket

 

1) Make sure your baby knows the difference between night and day. Doing this can be hard – a sleepy baby in the day and a wide-awake baby at night can have its benefits. You can get so much done in the day! All of that washing and cooking can be finished as baby is asleep, hurrah! But then comes night and you want to kick yourself for allowing baby to sleep all day. So- when you put baby down for a nap remember to put them in a dark room but when awake make sure they have lots of natural light. At night, make sure you have a quiet, serene environment. Make baby aware that it is dark and dark means sleep!

2) Before a nap, make sure they are happy and content. Before putting baby down in a Moses basket, prepare them for nap time. Make sure they have a clean nappy and aren't hungry. Make sure they aren't overtired- this can be difficult to predict but getting them down for a nap before they're almost pulling their ear off will, of course, make it easier for them to nod off. Keep the room dark and have a cuddle before gently putting them down. Talking to them and telling them 'it's nap time now' and doing this consistently will help them realise that the Moses basket is for sleeping.

3) Put baby down in the Moses basket awake. After having a cuddle and soothing them make sure baby is put down awake. Being able to put themselves to sleep is a huge step in establishing a healthy sleeping pattern. As they grow, babies will be able to self soothe themselves without waking you up in the middle of the night.

How long should baby stay in Moses basket?

So, you've got your baby to sleep in the Moses basket. Hurrah! But there are concerns as to how long a baby should stay in a Moses basket. They are only appropriate for newborns and should only be used until your baby is around three to four months old. When placing your baby in the Moses basket make sure they are in the "feet to foot" position, with their feet at the end of the cot or Moses basket.

The mattress in the Moses basket is significant too. The Lullaby Trust, a charity preventing unexpected deaths in infancy and promoting infant health, advise that "it is important that the mattress is firm, entirely flat, and waterproof, with no soft or cushioned areas, particularly around baby's head. Soft mattresses are known to increase the risk of SIDS. They make it harder for babies to lose body heat, which can cause them to become too hot. The surface of the mattress should be firm enough that when your baby is placed on it, their head does not sink in more than a few millimetres.

Safety is, of course, the main priority when it comes to choosing a Moses basket for your baby so make sure its handles are durable and won't break. They should meet in the middle, and you should always carry the basket with one hand underneath to support the baby.

Moses baskets can be incredibly practical, allowing you to be with baby while they are asleep- being able to move them from room to room when getting on with the endless tasks that come with parenthood.  

Encouraging your baby to nap in a snug and safe Moses basket will hopefully make for a happy baby.

 

Happy sleeping!

______________________________________________________________________________________

 

References:

1. The Lullaby Trust Product Guide

2. Reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Are you having a hard time when getting your baby to sleep in their Moses basket? Follow our tips to resolve this problem and to provide your baby the high - quality sleep. Tested and recommended by moKee parents.

0

Weaning tips for your baby - how to start?

3 min read

by Nichola Luldma-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

Weaning, which is more formally known as ‘complementary feeding’, is the introduction of solid foods into the diet of a baby who has been solely reliant on breast milk or infant formula milk.

During the initial stages of weaning it is less about how much babies are eating, and more about getting them used to the food and the idea of eating, as they will still be getting most of their nutrients from milk. As a baby eats more though, the proportion of energy from food will become more than that from milk.

Nutrients including iron are needed in greater quantities from 6 months of age (as the birth stores begin to run out) and neither breastmilk nor formula alone can provide these alone, meaning careful planning of a baby’s weaning diet is important.

When to Start Weaning your Baby

In the UK mothers are encouraged to breastfeed exclusively for their baby’s first six months of life, this is because breast milk protects babies from infections and diseases, in addition to providing health benefits for the mother too. If mothers cannot breastfeed then other alternatives may be explored, for example using formula milk.

If you do decide to start weaning before six months, do not do so before your baby is at least four months old (or 17 weeks) and make sure to not give your baby any of the following foods due to the increased risk of allergy: Wheat and gluten (found in foods such as bread, pasta and biscuits), egg, yoghurt, cheese and milk, nuts (including peanuts), seeds, fish and shellfish and soy-based formula (unless recommended by your GP). Be careful though as many commercial baby foods labelled as suitable from 4 months contain these ingredients.

It’s also important to avoid unpasteurised cheeses, salt and high salt foods such as soy sauce, high sugar foods like sweets, honey, foods with additives (E-numbers), diet foods and foods containing caffeine or stimulants at any stage during weaning.

How to Start Weaning your Baby

Allow your baby to touch and hold foods initially; soft finger foods should be cut up into pieces big enough so your baby can hold them in their first and see them sticking out of the top; these are needed to teach your baby how to move food around their mouths, encourage your baby to chew and ultimately swallow foods without gagging.

Between six and nine months of age your baby can be offered foods initially of a pureed or mashed consistency progressing to food with some lumps at around 7 months, as well as soft finger foods for example cooked pieces of broccoli, parsnips, peppers, courgette and avocado, as well as banana, kiwi and pineapple. Starting with bitter vegetables such as broccoli, spinach and cauliflower can be helpful to encourage the bitter and sour taste buds to develop; sweet taste buds are already mature and so your baby will accept sweeter foods more readily.

You can also offer your baby foods such as porridge as well as mashed potato, and soft bread sticks, in addition to soft pieces of foods rich in iron and protein, for example, slow cooked beef, dark chicken, turkey, fish (with no bones), eggs and lentils. Full fat, unsweetened and pasteurised yoghurts may also be offered however full fat cow’s milk shouldn’t be offered as a drink until your baby is 12 months old; it can, however, be used in cooking, on cereal or to mash up food. Baby rice doesn’t really have a place in modern day weaning, however, it can be useful to thicken purees if they come out too runny.

Initially, babies need only to be offered food once a day, but build up to three times a day to mimic your own three meal a day meal pattern by 6.5 to 7 months of age. By the time babies are around 12 months old, they should be eating at least three small portions of healthy family meals plus 3 small snacks in between. If foods are rejected – and the bitter vegetables will be at least initially, keep offering the food as it may take several attempts for your baby to eat and enjoy it.

Regarding fluid, breastfed babies should continue to be offered regular breastfeeds but you may need to stop feeding on demand and encourage a routine in order for weaning to progress. Formula fed babies should be offered around 500-600ml of infant formula across 3-4 feeds; in hot weather formula fed babies may need some extra cooled boiled water from a cup to avoid dehydration.

Foods to Avoid

To reduce the risk of choking babies shouldn’t be given whole grapes, hard and small pieces of fruit or vegetables such as raw apple and carrot (these should be grated initially), whole nuts and popcorn.

Baby’s should also not be given honey before the age of 12 months, as although very unlikely it may contain the food poisoning bacteria botulism which can make them extremely ill, and you shouldn’t add any sugar or salt to any of their foods; remove their food portion from the pan first if you wish to add these to your meal.

Sugary foods such as biscuits and cakes are unnecessary and salty foods such as bacon, ham, bread and cheese should also be limited.

Weaning Supplements

Breastfed babies require daily vitamin drops containing 8.5 to 10mcg of vitamin D. Formula fed babies only require this if they’re having less than 500ml of formula a day (as it is already fortified).

From the age of six months, babies should be given vitamin drops containing vitamins A, C and D, unless, as mentioned above, they’re having 500ml of formula a day. These vitamins should continue until children are five years old.

We wish you all the best in your weaning journey!

by Nichola Luldma-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

When & how to start weaning your baby are the 2 questions that all new parents ask. What can the baby eat and how to make them love eating food that is healthy for them? Here are the tips, which will make this journey easy.

Blog 1 Best tips to start weaning your baby and succeed at it!
04 Nov 2019

Best tips to start weaning your baby and succeed at it!

Weaning tips for your baby - how to start?

3 min read

by Nichola Luldma-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

Weaning, which is more formally known as ‘complementary feeding’, is the introduction of solid foods into the diet of a baby who has been solely reliant on breast milk or infant formula milk.

During the initial stages of weaning it is less about how much babies are eating, and more about getting them used to the food and the idea of eating, as they will still be getting most of their nutrients from milk. As a baby eats more though, the proportion of energy from food will become more than that from milk.

Nutrients including iron are needed in greater quantities from 6 months of age (as the birth stores begin to run out) and neither breastmilk nor formula alone can provide these alone, meaning careful planning of a baby’s weaning diet is important.

When to Start Weaning your Baby

In the UK mothers are encouraged to breastfeed exclusively for their baby’s first six months of life, this is because breast milk protects babies from infections and diseases, in addition to providing health benefits for the mother too. If mothers cannot breastfeed then other alternatives may be explored, for example using formula milk.

If you do decide to start weaning before six months, do not do so before your baby is at least four months old (or 17 weeks) and make sure to not give your baby any of the following foods due to the increased risk of allergy: Wheat and gluten (found in foods such as bread, pasta and biscuits), egg, yoghurt, cheese and milk, nuts (including peanuts), seeds, fish and shellfish and soy-based formula (unless recommended by your GP). Be careful though as many commercial baby foods labelled as suitable from 4 months contain these ingredients.

It’s also important to avoid unpasteurised cheeses, salt and high salt foods such as soy sauce, high sugar foods like sweets, honey, foods with additives (E-numbers), diet foods and foods containing caffeine or stimulants at any stage during weaning.

How to Start Weaning your Baby

Allow your baby to touch and hold foods initially; soft finger foods should be cut up into pieces big enough so your baby can hold them in their first and see them sticking out of the top; these are needed to teach your baby how to move food around their mouths, encourage your baby to chew and ultimately swallow foods without gagging.

Between six and nine months of age your baby can be offered foods initially of a pureed or mashed consistency progressing to food with some lumps at around 7 months, as well as soft finger foods for example cooked pieces of broccoli, parsnips, peppers, courgette and avocado, as well as banana, kiwi and pineapple. Starting with bitter vegetables such as broccoli, spinach and cauliflower can be helpful to encourage the bitter and sour taste buds to develop; sweet taste buds are already mature and so your baby will accept sweeter foods more readily.

You can also offer your baby foods such as porridge as well as mashed potato, and soft bread sticks, in addition to soft pieces of foods rich in iron and protein, for example, slow cooked beef, dark chicken, turkey, fish (with no bones), eggs and lentils. Full fat, unsweetened and pasteurised yoghurts may also be offered however full fat cow’s milk shouldn’t be offered as a drink until your baby is 12 months old; it can, however, be used in cooking, on cereal or to mash up food. Baby rice doesn’t really have a place in modern day weaning, however, it can be useful to thicken purees if they come out too runny.

Initially, babies need only to be offered food once a day, but build up to three times a day to mimic your own three meal a day meal pattern by 6.5 to 7 months of age. By the time babies are around 12 months old, they should be eating at least three small portions of healthy family meals plus 3 small snacks in between. If foods are rejected – and the bitter vegetables will be at least initially, keep offering the food as it may take several attempts for your baby to eat and enjoy it.

Regarding fluid, breastfed babies should continue to be offered regular breastfeeds but you may need to stop feeding on demand and encourage a routine in order for weaning to progress. Formula fed babies should be offered around 500-600ml of infant formula across 3-4 feeds; in hot weather formula fed babies may need some extra cooled boiled water from a cup to avoid dehydration.

Foods to Avoid

To reduce the risk of choking babies shouldn’t be given whole grapes, hard and small pieces of fruit or vegetables such as raw apple and carrot (these should be grated initially), whole nuts and popcorn.

Baby’s should also not be given honey before the age of 12 months, as although very unlikely it may contain the food poisoning bacteria botulism which can make them extremely ill, and you shouldn’t add any sugar or salt to any of their foods; remove their food portion from the pan first if you wish to add these to your meal.

Sugary foods such as biscuits and cakes are unnecessary and salty foods such as bacon, ham, bread and cheese should also be limited.

Weaning Supplements

Breastfed babies require daily vitamin drops containing 8.5 to 10mcg of vitamin D. Formula fed babies only require this if they’re having less than 500ml of formula a day (as it is already fortified).

From the age of six months, babies should be given vitamin drops containing vitamins A, C and D, unless, as mentioned above, they’re having 500ml of formula a day. These vitamins should continue until children are five years old.

We wish you all the best in your weaning journey!

by Nichola Luldma-Raine Registered Dietitian & blogger at MummyNutrition.com

When & how to start weaning your baby are the 2 questions that all new parents ask. What can the baby eat and how to make them love eating food that is healthy for them? Here are the tips, which will make this journey easy.

0

Mini Sofa Talks | Episode 03: Ophelia & Rupert

3 min read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Today, on the Mini Sofa Talks, we meet Ophelia and Rupert who live around the corner from each other and with Ophelia being the eldest (5), Rupert, who is 3, looks up to her. Here for moKee’s Mini Sofa Talks, Ophelia teaches Rupert to read….

 

Ophelia: Rupert, can you read?

Rupert: Yes.

Ophelia: What does this say?

Rupert: ROOOOOAAAARRR!

Ophelia: No, it doesn’t. Do you like this book? (Ophelia is reading A Stephen Fry book)

Rupert: Yes, it’s yellow! My favourite colour…

Ophelia: I like orange…

Rupert: Can you say the alphabet?

Ophelia: Of course, I go to school!

Rupert: What do you do at school?

Ophelia: Learn and play - I have lots of friends and like my teachers.

Rupert: I want to go to school!

Ophelia: When you are as big as me, you will and you will learn to read.

Rupert: Your name begins with an O.

Ophelia: And yours begins with a R… What words can you spell?

Rupert: T REX! And supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

Ophelia: Mary Poppins says that!

Rupert: Shall we try to spell it?

Ophelia: It’s quite long?! Maybe when you are older….

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Today, on the Mini Sofa Talks, we meet Ophelia and Rupert who live around the corner from each other and with Ophelia being the eldest (5), Rupert, who is 3, looks up to her. Here Ophelia teaches Rupert to read….

Blog 1 Mini Sofa Talks | Episode 03: Ophelia & Rupert
04 Nov 2019

Mini Sofa Talks | Episode 03: Ophelia & Rupert

Mini Sofa Talks | Episode 03: Ophelia & Rupert

3 min read

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Today, on the Mini Sofa Talks, we meet Ophelia and Rupert who live around the corner from each other and with Ophelia being the eldest (5), Rupert, who is 3, looks up to her. Here for moKee’s Mini Sofa Talks, Ophelia teaches Rupert to read….

 

Ophelia: Rupert, can you read?

Rupert: Yes.

Ophelia: What does this say?

Rupert: ROOOOOAAAARRR!

Ophelia: No, it doesn’t. Do you like this book? (Ophelia is reading A Stephen Fry book)

Rupert: Yes, it’s yellow! My favourite colour…

Ophelia: I like orange…

Rupert: Can you say the alphabet?

Ophelia: Of course, I go to school!

Rupert: What do you do at school?

Ophelia: Learn and play - I have lots of friends and like my teachers.

Rupert: I want to go to school!

Ophelia: When you are as big as me, you will and you will learn to read.

Rupert: Your name begins with an O.

Ophelia: And yours begins with a R… What words can you spell?

Rupert: T REX! And supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!

Ophelia: Mary Poppins says that!

Rupert: Shall we try to spell it?

Ophelia: It’s quite long?! Maybe when you are older….

by Becca Smith @beccasmith_tomlins

Today, on the Mini Sofa Talks, we meet Ophelia and Rupert who live around the corner from each other and with Ophelia being the eldest (5), Rupert, who is 3, looks up to her. Here Ophelia teaches Rupert to read….

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